Author Archives: Mark Wilson

Sequence Stratigraphy and other topics (April 28 & 30)

During the last of this course we traditionally cover topics of our choice. If we have time, we will talk about the Channeled Scablands of eastern Washington and related topics, including the famous jökulhlaups. There is a good story here … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sequence Stratigraphy and other topics (April 28 & 30)

Tectonics and Sedimentation (April 21 & 23)

On Tuesday we will cover petroleum from a sedimentary perspective. Please review the links from last week. “Tectonics and Sedimentation” is a broad topic with few direct web references; we’ll start with a review on Tuesday. You may want to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Tectonics and Sedimentation (April 21 & 23)

Coal and Petroleum (April 14 & 16)

We’ll finish phosphates on Tuesday (review last week’s links) and then on to King Coal and Big Oil. Let’s start with the Wikipedia page on coal, which is very good. A visit to the World Coal Association page will give … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Coal and Petroleum (April 14 & 16)

Siliceous Sediments, Ironstones, and Phosphates (April 7 & 9)

Chert is not a big topic on the Web. Wikipedia’s article on chert is scholarly but short. An amateur has put together a very detailed page on flint and chert (and what may or may not be the differences between … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Siliceous Sediments, Ironstones, and Phosphates (April 7 & 9)

Evaporites and the Environments in Which They Form (March 31 & April 2)

For evaporites, there is nothing quite like a virtual field trip to a sabkha, courtesy of Dr. Wikipedia. The Wikipedia page on evaporites is another good gateway of information and links. I’ve worked with the evaporites in the Purbeck Formation … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Evaporites and the Environments in Which They Form (March 31 & April 2)

Continental Margins and Deep Marine Systems (March 24 & 26)

Our Spring Break coincided with a crisis point in global history. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed everything we’re doing. This course, like all Wooster courses and, for that matter, all college courses in the country, is going online only. We … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Continental Margins and Deep Marine Systems (March 24 & 26)

Carbonate Systems (March 3 & 5)

Carbonate sediments are gifts of the sea, so let’s go there first. Maybe you’d like to stay in this nice little resort in Belize? NOAA has a wonderful website called “The Coral Kingdom” with many online photographs of reef animals … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Carbonate Systems (March 3 & 5)

Carbonate Petrology (February 25 & 27)

It is with carbonate rocks that we see most distinctly that life is a geological process (trademarked, all rights reserved). The large majority of carbonate sediments are directly derived from living systems, and as such they are excellent indicators of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Carbonate Petrology (February 25 & 27)

Coastal & Shallow Sea Systems (February 18 & 20)

The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program maintains an extensive set of webpages. One of the most interesting for coastal geology covers the coastal damage produced by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, including impressive lidar images of pre- and post-hurricane coastal … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Coastal & Shallow Sea Systems (February 18 & 20)

Deltaic and Estuarine Systems (February 11 & 13)

With deltas and estuaries we can apply all those principles of aquatic sedimentation we have learned, and add a few more. The Danube Delta looks like an interesting place to visit, even if it is under siege from pollution and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Deltaic and Estuarine Systems (February 11 & 13)