Author Archives: Mark Wilson

Sequence Stratigraphy and other topics (April 30 & May 2)

There is no better resource for sequence stratigraphy than the excellent on-line guide written by my colleague Steve Holland at the University of Georgia Stratigraphy Laboratory. The extensive sequence stratigraphy webpages at the University of South Carolina are also very … Continue reading

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Tectonics and Sedimentation (April 23 & 25)

“Tectonics and Sedimentation” is a broad topic with few direct web references; we’ll start with a review on Tuesday. You may want to revisit Plate Tectonic theory with this primer on plate tectonics. An excellent (and very useful) website is … Continue reading

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Coal and Petroleum (April 16 & 18)

King Coal and Big Oil this week. Let’s start with the Wikipedia page on coal, which is very good. A visit to the World Coal Association page will give you a sense of the magnitude of coal production. Here are … Continue reading

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Siliceous Sediments, Ironstones, and Phosphates (April 9 & 11)

Chert is not a big topic on the Web. Wikipedia’s article on chert is scholarly but short. An amateur has put together a very detailed page on flint and chert (and what may or may not be the differences between … Continue reading

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Evaporites and the Environments in Which They Form (April 2 & 4)

For evaporites, there is nothing quite like a virtual field trip to a sabkha, courtesy of Dr. Wikipedia. The Wikipedia page on evaporites is another good gateway of information and links. I’ve worked with the evaporites in the Purbeck Formation … Continue reading

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Continental Margins and Deep Marine Systems (March 26 & 28)

We will spend some of your first week back from Spring Break finishing carbonates and their depositional environments (see previous links). We will then move into deeper marine systems and return for a short time to siliciclastic sediments (especially clays). … Continue reading

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Carbonate Systems (March 5 & 7)

Carbonate sediments are gifts of the sea, so let’s go there first. Maybe you’d like to stay in this nice little resort in Belize? NOAA has a wonderful website called “The Coral Kingdom” with many online photographs of reef animals … Continue reading

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Carbonate Petrology (February 26 & 28)

It is with carbonate rocks that we see most distinctly that life is a geological process (trademarked, all rights reserved). The large majority of carbonate sediments are directly derived from living systems, and as such they are excellent indicators of … Continue reading

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Coastal & Shallow Sea Systems (February 19 & 21)

The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program maintains an extensive set of webpages. One of the most interesting for coastal geology covers the coastal damage produced by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, including impressive lidar images of pre- and post-hurricane coastal … Continue reading

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Deltaic and Estuarine Systems (February 12 & 14)

With deltas and estuaries we can apply all those principles of aquatic sedimentation we have learned, and add a few more. The Danube Delta looks like an interesting place to visit, even if it is under siege from pollution and … Continue reading

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